Call to Action: Use Psychology to end Trump Presidency

In Beastly & Beautiful, Cultural & Political by Louisa Leontiades

There’s only one way to break a someone who is living in an extreme fantasy world, but it means risking the mind of the person themselves. It is tantamount to throwing the baby away with the bathwater. You must accept that this throws out the baby as well (a metaphor which suits Donald particularly well), because they do not–cannot–function properly outside of their bathwater. They have not learned how.

When My Relationship With Facebook Became Abusive

In Beastly & Beautiful, Cultural & Political by Louisa Leontiades

Facebook is not a news feed. It is an opinion feed where subjective ignorance is lauded and verified journalism denigrated simply by creating a false equivalence. It is a he said-she said feed. And I cannot stay in a relationship with anyone or anything which undermines my ability to trust in myself. I am thrown back into gaslit trauma where there is no security, no clarity. It is the screeching of chaos and now I must make my own order.

Destined to be a Burden

In Beastly & Beautiful, Psychology, Psychology-Self by Louisa Leontiades

What I see when I look in the mirror is someone to fear. Someone who will cost society money–a liability as opposed to an asset. And I’m scared. Terrified even. I feel like I’ve fooled those I love and who love me. I’ve always wanted to be loved and to be the kind of person worthy of being loved. And now it’s as if they’ve got a present wrapped up in a shiny bow but opened it up just to find something ugly and vile inside. Me.

How Trump Triggers Complex Trauma

In Beastly & Beautiful, Cultural & Political by Louisa Leontiades

Like the flare up of an allergy, and since the shock of the midsummer brexit, I am now in hypervigilance. I see potential harm long before it turns into active threat. And when the red rage comes, I fight or flee to remove that potential from my environment, from my children’s environment. With the Trump presidency, I cannot. It is everywhere. I see it everywhere. Threat is everywhere.

Ethics of Family Screws Democracy

In Beastly & Beautiful, My Feminism, Psychology by Louisa Leontiades

We attach to those of our ilk, beyond rationality. And few of us have enough self-awareness to overcome it. The law and our systems were designed to counteract this; ‘the law is reason free from passion’. The very concept of the American electoral system is based on a fundamental belief that some people are able to be more objective than others and will vote for the benefit of all. And yet because of the strength of their own self-interest, the strength of their own reptilian instincts, they will naturally fail to do so.

My Privilege is Uncomfortable

In Beastly & Beautiful, Personal Development, Psychology by Louisa Leontiades

So white folk, we have a task in front of us which might seem huge, but really it isn’t. It is to face our own prejudice when the most obvious and comfortable way to survive is to stay in our bubble. It is to step up and be accountable for our ignorance, even if ignorance is part of our humanity. I will hold your hand as we overcome our fragility and cultivate empathy and battle our minds which tell us that it’s not our problem.

Note to Self

In Beastly & Beautiful, Psychology, Self-Esteem by Louisa Leontiades

Your limits are otherwise known as your boundaries, they’re what you use to protect your power, to govern it responsibly. They’re what allows you to interact healthily with others.

Racism stigma furthers the Racist Agenda in Sweden

In Beastly & Beautiful, Cultural & Political, Swedish Living by Louisa Leontiades

One reason why this immigration was considered successful had nothing to do with Sweden’s ability to integrate immigrants; only that the type of immigrants arriving were more easily ‘integrate-able’ as is still the case today for me. At first sight therefore, when immigrants are able to fit into Swedish culture at a level which allows them to peaceably live and work within the system, we do not see backlashes against immigration.

Sacrificing integrity for the greater good. But what greater good is there than integrity?

In Beastly & Beautiful, Personal Development, Psychology by Louisa Leontiades

But when people are dear to me, I feel they deserve more than ghosting. They deserve at least an attempt to explain why our relationship will be changing. The choice is not binary of course, we could simply be less in each other’s lives. I could reduce contact, fobbing them off with excuses until I achieved my desired effect. But that reduces their power of consent. If they knew how I truly felt about their values and/or consequent actions, then they may choose to cut contact altogether.

Are We Allowed to Objectify Kim Kardashian’s Butt?

In Beastly & Beautiful, Psychology, Psychology-Self by Louisa Leontiades

There are some instances where objectification is entirely appropriate and needed. For a short while–for example–a baby cannot walk, and cannot feed itself. They have no agency, no power to decide on where they go or what they do. As parents or caregivers we take on this agency. We are literally a baby’s arms and legs… we dress them, we feed them, we pick them up and put them down.

Humans are pre-programmed to objectify. So how can we help it?

In Beastly & Beautiful, My Feminism by Louisa Leontiades

Because I went. I saw Tarzan. I objectified, and thoroughly enjoyed doing so, thinking it at best harmless fun and at worst a sort of inconsequential revenge for all the years that my sisters and I have been objectified. This is what the men go on about, I thought. Yes, it’s fun. Besides, surely the price of a cinema ticket makes no difference in the grand scheme of things…. does it?

Trump, Weltschmertz and Me

In Beastly & Beautiful, Cultural & Political by Louisa Leontiades

I’m not laughing anymore. I’m crying because what this farce of an election has done, is to uncover evil in my own home, in my own friends and yes, also in myself. It has torn the veil off those relationships I believed were rock solid. Not because my world or social circle are anything like as extreme as Trump, but because extreme or not, his vile behaviours–like the objectification of women–are so commonplace.