Why I’m solo-polyamorous but living in a community

Louisa Leontiades Diaries, Epic Relationships, Polyamory

After many such processing sessions and respective conclusions, I’ve come to a grand, meta conclusion. Whilst I might long for multiple connections, I function better alone. I learned some years ago that a solo style of polyamory would be the smart choice for me; that’s a bit of a conundrum when you’re already in a household of six which includes two small kids.

Ethics of Family Screws Democracy

Louisa Leontiades Beastly & Beautiful, My Feminism, Psychology

We attach to those of our ilk, beyond rationality. And few of us have enough self-awareness to overcome it. The law and our systems were designed to counteract this; ‘the law is reason free from passion’. The very concept of the American electoral system is based on a fundamental belief that some people are able to be more objective than others and will vote for the benefit of all. And yet because of the strength of their own self-interest, the strength of their own reptilian instincts, they will naturally fail to do so.

My Privilege is Uncomfortable

Louisa Leontiades Beastly & Beautiful, Personal Development, Psychology

So white folk, we have a task in front of us which might seem huge, but really it isn’t. It is to face our own prejudice when the most obvious and comfortable way to survive is to stay in our bubble. It is to step up and be accountable for our ignorance, even if ignorance is part of our humanity. I will hold your hand as we overcome our fragility and cultivate empathy and battle our minds which tell us that it’s not our problem.

A look at “The Polyamorous Home”

Louisa Leontiades Books, Reviews

In a polyamorous household especially those with children, there must be a disproportionate number of families which include individuals who may understandably be less invested in creating a well functioning community than say, the biological parents. In those situations and for other communities comprising differing beliefs (including religion) Jess Mahler’s discussion framework–using concepts of hard boundaries and soft boundaries from the kink world–comes in handy.